C3 no.360_1408

$29.4

Fundamental, 14th Venice Biennale
Rem goes to Venice_Diego Terna
− Port of Kinmen Ferry Terminal Competition_Junya Ishigami + Associates
− Catholic University of Louvain, Architecture School Competition_Aires Mateus

Energy efficient ‘n Sustainable – Critical Step towards Green Future
Sustainability, what’s it to do with us?_Julian Lindley

Energy builds the future
Energy Efficiency: Building for the Future_Fabrizio Aimar
− Aquaterra Environmental Center_Tectoniques Architects
− The Columbia Building_Skylab Architecture
− Energy Bunker_HHS Planer + Architekten AG
− Zero Energy School in Solar Panels_Mikou Design Studio
− Sparkassenhöfe Graz_Szyszkowitz-Kowalski + Partner ZT GmbH
− Trento Science Museum_Renzo Piano Building Workshop

Seven Shades of Green
Seven Shades of Green_Simone Corda
− Naturbad Riehen, Natural Swimming Pool_Herzog & de Meuron
− GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals Administrative Building_Coarchitecture
− Ecoarea Complex_Triarch Studio
− Pamela Coyne Library_Branch Studio Architects
− Green Energy Laboratory_Archea Associati
− Campus Repsol_Rafael de La-Hoz Arquitectos
− ASU Polytechnic Academic Buildings_Lake Flato Architects + RSP Architects

Category:

Energy efficient ‘n Sustainable – Critical Step towards Green Future
Sustainability, what’s it to do with us?_Julian Lindley

The majority of discussion on Climate Change is focused on chemical emissions and the dangerous increase in concentration of compounds such as carbon dioxide in the upper atmosphere. This in turn is normally associated with the consumption of petro-chemicals, simply put the internal combustion engine and plastics. However this is a simplistic approach as it ring fences the issues within the economic market sectors of transportation and manufacturing indeed by association the consumption of products which are transient and short term. This viewpoint conveniently places the responsibility of climate change elsewhere from architecture. This is a distraction as we all have a role to play and a level of introspective questioning about our own practice and lifestyles is required. Buildings, although without such an immediate and explicit impact on the environment, do form part of the debate due to their longevity. Impacts over a short term, a day or week are minimal but with a lifetime often in the hundreds of years consequences can be great. If we include social or cultural implications of buildings then the responsibility of planners and architects becomes even greater. We are creating buildings for our needs but which will be used by our Grandchildren. If we include impact over time then buildings elevate themselves to key villains to the environment along with cars. Although the word “sustainability”: has the connotation of a modern concern or fad the first question raised by Ann Thorpe1 and others is “What are we trying to Sustain?”

 


 

Energy builds the future
Energy Efficiency: Building for the Future_Fabrizio Aimar

2050. No way out to escape. Global warming, GHG emissions, human growth and Heat Island Effect influence the future of the globe in a dramatic matter. Only two Celsius degrees divide the mankind from an unbearable living conditions. Can the energy efficiency save the world? In this article this possible future scenario is examined between scientific analyses and technical approaches. Six projects, built all around the world, are presented with special focus on the environmental technology, energy conservation and sustainability aspects.

 


 

Seven Shades of Green
Seven Shades of Green_Simone Corda

There is a growing trend of a well-informed and passionate part of society that is driving us all towards a more sustainable future. In this regard, architects play an important role in exploring potential pathways, through the creation of more efficient and environmentally sound buildings. In fact, architecture is seeing a new generation of cutting-edge sustainable buildings, which rely on innovative solutions combining new technologies with knowledge from the past. Having moved past the experimentalism that characterised the architectural “green” production of the 1990s, the new wave of sustainability appears to have come to maturity in terms of language, as well as energy consumption objectives. This is a likely result of the combination of several references in the design process: energy efficiency is no longer the sole and simple centre of attention; instead, the environment as a whole – including cultural dimensions – has become the guiding principle.

Additional information

Weight2 kg
Issue

C3 no.360_1408

Page

208

Size

22.5cmX 30cm

Binding

pur & jacket

Language

English + Korean

ISSN

2092-5190